PLURAL

PLURAL is an online journal that caters to fiction, nonfiction, and criticism geared towards prose.

You are neither here nor there,
A hurry through which known and strange things pass
As big soft buffetings come at the car sideways
And catch the heart off guard and blow it open

—Seamus Heaney, from “Postscript” (via the-final-sentence)

(Source: hiddenshores, via the-final-sentence)

All her life she had believed in something more, in the mystery that shape-shifted at the edge of her senses. It was the flutter of moth wings on glass and the promise of river nymphs in the dappled creek beds. It was the smell of oak trees on the summer evening she fell in love, and the way the dawn threw itself across the cow pond and turned the water to light.

—Eowyn Ivey, The Snow Child (via feellng)

(Source: feellng)

Even this late it happens:
the coming of love, the coming of light.
You wake and the candles are lit as if by themselves,
stars gather, dreams pour into your pillows,
sending up warm bouquets of air.
Even this late the bones of the body shine
and tomorrow’s dust flares into breath.

—Mark Strand (via observando)

It’s the path of least resistance to reading, which is why even now that I’ve realized it, I haven’t been inclined to do anything about it. There hasn’t been any great and conscious rush back to physical books over digital. It just seems to have stopped being one-over-the-other all of a sudden. I’m happy to take books either way, which is a completely new experience.

—from Accidentally Going Digital by Peter Damien (via bookriot)

theparisreview:

“This late-night walking is the one thing about the city that’s most saturated my work.” Ansel Elkins, our poet-in-residence at the Standard, East Village, talks to The New Yorker about her experience.
Illustration: Tom Bachtell.

theparisreview:

“This late-night walking is the one thing about the city that’s most saturated my work.” Ansel Elkins, our poet-in-residence at the Standard, East Village, talks to The New Yorker about her experience.

Illustration: Tom Bachtell.

(via yeahwriters)

theparisreview:

“It’s the story of what it means to live in a cultural climate that stifles almost every creative impulse, and why it so often seems we should stop trying.”

Dan Piepenbring on Cory Arcangel’s new book, Working on My Novel, a compilation of tweets from people who are putatively at work on novels.